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Read editor’s interview with me in Persephone’s Daughters

It was a delight to discuss my memoir, the #MeToo Movement, toxic masculinity, forgiveness, and more with Meggie Royer, editor of the feminist publication Persephone’s Daughters. Meggie asked me if I felt comfortable using the term “toxic masculinity” and I said yes. Since then, I’ve learned that it can alienate some men. To me, it…

Podcast interview highlights healing from childhood trauma
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Podcast interview highlights healing from childhood trauma

It’s rare to be asked, in an interview with a businessman, about your spiritual beliefs and how they’ve influenced your life choices. Thankfully, author and executive Ken Hannaman is no ordinary businessperson. He’s the author and host of the podcast Ungraduated Living and like me, drawn to eastern philosophies and religions. That’s part of what…

Ah, This is the Life: my feature on Secret Cove Marina
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Ah, This is the Life: my feature on Secret Cove Marina

It was a treat to interview Andreas and Kendra Tize, owners of Secret Cove Marina in Halfmoon Bay, BC. I got to luxuriate, albeit briefly, in their 5,000-square-foot float home and discover the cozy seafood restaurant The Upper Deck. (I knew Andreas as the Roberts Creek rep for the Sunshine Coast Regional District.) Their marina…

Writing as a Transformational Tool: my podcast chat with host Nelia Hutt
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Writing as a Transformational Tool: my podcast chat with host Nelia Hutt

I enjoyed my recent chat with Nelia Hutt, host of the Apple podcast Giving Starts With You, based in Barrie, Ont. Under the topic Writing As a Transformational Tool, I discussed how I help others find their voice when writing about traumatic events. I shared my experiences writing the incest memoir No Letter in Your…

Featured guest on podcast How to Survive Society
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Featured guest on podcast How to Survive Society

  Listen to the podcast here.   I enjoyed my chat with Abby Ayoola, host of the Toronto podcast How to Survive Society. We discussed my incest memoir No Letter in Your Pocket and my work coaching authors of trauma memoirs. We talked about how to stay resilient, and find the courage to share your…

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My online course Writing From Pain to Power begins Feb. 23

I am teaching an 8-week, online creative nonfiction class Writing From Pain to Power in the spring of 2022 through the University of King’s College in Halifax. My students are from across the country, writing about real-life traumas in their lives. Most are hoping to publish a memoir or essays. Using a trauma-informed approach, we…

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Candace Campo celebrates her Indigenous history, culture and ancestors through Talaysay Tours

I profiled and photographed Candace Campo, co-founder of Talaysay Tours and a shishalh Nation member, for the winter 2022 issue of Sunshine Coast Life Magazine. Each year, her First Nations ecotour company hosts visitors from around the globe, introducing them to Pacific Northwest Indigenous culture, history, ancestors, local flora and fauna, and the spiritual significance…

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Jessica Silvey weaves the legacy of ancestors in cedar

    It was a delight to profile Jessica Silvey, who’s shíshálh and Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish) with the ancestral name Kwahama Kwatleematt, and has been weaving cedar baskets, hats, and décor for more than 30 years. I profiled her, the owner of Red Cedar Woman studio, as the cover story for the winter 2021 issue of…

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My essay “A slow goodbye” part of new anthology

As my late husband Frank McElroy was dying at home through 2018-19, it was tough to write about my challenges as a caregiver. Although I couldn’t distance myself from the ongoing experience, I wanted to describe both my conflicting emotions and the overwhelming support and generosity of my local community. The result became the essay…

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Heather Conn profile: hospice volunteer

Some people could never imagine offering comfort as a bedside companion to a stranger who is dying. Or sitting in an all-night vigil for someone’s final hours. In hospice training, we learn that compassion, deep listening, acceptance, and non-judgment are core traits needed to remain truly present with those who are dying or grieving a…

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Mentors in Violence Training held Dec. 6 in Sechelt, BC

I was delighted to receive one-day training in Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) on Dec. 6, 2016 in Sechelt, BC. Roughly a dozen of us attended, including local teachers and providers of an after-school teen drop-in program. The event’s co-facilitators were Wayne Spychka, my boss as an SCCSS gender violence prevention worker, and Keely Halward, Wayne’s boss. Both are experienced MVP mentors and…

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Heather Conn reveals two favourite cards from her SoulCollage deck

The following article, which I wrote, appeared in the Sept. 26, 2016 issue of the global e-newsletter Soul Treasures, published by KaleidoSoul in Massachusetts. Reader Kas Sobey-Knabb responded: “Heather, just wanted to reach out to you after reading your upbeat and lovely piece in Kaleidosoul Soul Songs.Enjoyed it and meeting your 2 Neters [symbolic guides]! Quite colorful…

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An honour to host and organize Canada’s first Mentors in Violence Prevention program

I was honoured to organize and host Canada’s first Mentors in Violence Prevention program in Sechelt, BC on May 5. Here’s a story that I wrote for the local media:   A former B.C. Lions player, open discussions and hands-on scenarios recently helped about 40 local high school students learn what words and actions can…

Let’s learn from Indigenous culture

From participating in a sweat lodge to creating their own medicine bag, UBC Dentistry students gained new cross-cultural depth and knowledge at a remote B.C. clinic. Click this Impressions fall 13 Chilcotin link to read “Dentistry Students in the Chilcotin: Gratitude Goes Both Ways” (Impression magazine, fall 2013, University of B.C.)

UBC Law magazine: Lawyers in small communities think big

A book about John Steinbeck’s marine biologist friend inspired B.C. lawyer Myron Plett to move to Ucluelet and set up practice in this island town. Plett is one of four B.C. lawyers I profiled for the cover story “Thinking big in small communities” for the winter 2012 issue of UBC Law magazine. Pictured on the…

Why so many cavities in pre-school immigrant children?

Dr. Rosamund Harrison, chair of pediatric dentistry at the University of British Columbia, does exciting cutting-edge research and clinical work in low-income and new immigrant communities in Canada. Many of UBC’s treated preschool children have a high rate of cavities. Her compassionate, hands-on work has resulted in huge improvements in dental care in groups ranging from South Asians and Vietnamese in…

Forensic dentistry: a lot more than just murder cases

  In the fall of 2008, I interviewed forensic dentist Dr. David Sweet, who runs B.O.L.D., the world’s leading forensic dentistry lab at the University of British Columbia. Sweet has pioneered many cutting-edge forensic techniques and  appeared on the television show Cold Case Files. Click this link http://www.dentistry.ubc.ca/impressions/2008/fall/Impressions-Fall2008.pdf to see my Impressions magazine cover story, page 9. (Impressions won…

Traditional or alternative medicine?

Both traditional and alternative medicine have their strengths and weaknesses. As contributing writer to Canada’s national publication Alive magazine in 2003, I wrote a feature that explores these two treatment modalities. This piece explores the benefits of holistic medicine, and the value of allopathic medicine for surgeries, serious injuries, and specialized care. Click this link to read…

Nail polish contains dangerous chemicals

“If a woman things her dazzling nail polish looks like dynamite, she’s not far from the truth: it contains a potentially harmful chemical used to make explosives. . .” That’s how my feature “Spiked!” begins in the April 2003 issue of Canada’s national Alive magazine. The article not only addresses the ingredients of most nail polishes, including toxic…

How did the role of women shift in post-war Nicaragua?

    Nicaraguan women in the 1990s faced high unemployment, exploitation and discrimination. But thanks to Vancity funding to a grassroots group in this central American nation, women gained job and business training and micro-loans. I wrote about this for Working Dollars, the newsletter for VanCity Savings Credit Union. Click on this Nicaraguan women link to read…